Standing Rock Legal Update and Call to Action

Dear climate activists and Standing Rock supporters,

You’re invited to a special event in Sunnyvale next Wed (9/6) at 7 PM with attorneys Chase Iron Eyes and Daniel Sheehan of the Lakota People’s Law Project. The day after speaking at Google, Chase and Danny will join us at the Congregational Church of Sunnyvale for a local event that is free and open to the public.

Chase Iron Eyes is a citizen of Standing Rock and a leading spokesperson for the NoDAPL movement. In February, following intense surveillance by militarized security forces, he was arrested and charged with two felonies by North Dakota law enforcement.


Daniel Sheehan is president of the Romero Institute and a renowned constitutional attorney. As chief defense counsel for Chase Iron Eyes, his legal strategy will expose the collusion between government, industry and militarized security to suppress Native populations and the right of all Americans to peacefully demonstrate.

I attended their talk in Berkeley last week and thought it was a perfect blend of information and inspiration–from the opening video to the legal defense and offense, from Danny’s deep knowledge of constitutional rights to Chase’s ability to connect and ground us to our common humanity, from updates on individual water protectors to the petition to #DropDAPLCharges, from the call to divest to the push for public banking–they covered it all.

If they can do the same or similar in Sunnyvale, I don’t think anyone who supported the Standing Rock movement will regret going. I was really glad I went.

Tickets are free to attend, but Pastor Ron has graciously donated space for this event and we’d love to channel support for the Congregational Church’s Homeless Services where donations of ready-to-eat meals and toilet paper are needed and welcome.

Doors open at 7:00 PM for seating, tabling with local groups and interaction. Speakers begin at 7:30 PM. Please join us next Wednesday and help us get the word out!

With gratitude,
Melanie Liu
Defund Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)

Submitted by Adobe Meadows resident: Tell the Palo Alto City Council to support strengthened Renter Protection

Tonight at 7:15pm (or so), the Palo Alto City Council will consider a colleagues memo from Councilmembers DuBois, Holman, and Kou to strengthen renter protection for Palo Alto residents.  See http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/civicax/filebank/documents/59776

The Rental Housing Problem

Rental housing cost in Palo Alto and the region has exploded in recent years as the pace of job growth has tripled compared to the rate of housing growth. Housing that is being built is predominantly high-end along with small amounts of subsidized, low-income housing. The needs of moderate-income workers and families have been ignored, undermining our social and economic balance. Vital members of our community, teachers, nurses, police, firefighters, utility workers, shopkeepers, social workers and others are all being driven away.

Although big growth in the tech economy has been a boon to many, it has caused negative disruptions to our region including a huge growth in housing demand that has harmed affordability with many long-term renters being driven out or forced to pay more than they can afford. Since 2011, the average rent in Palo Alto has increased 50% while the county median income has grown at less than1/10 that rate. Palo Alto needs to provide renters with the sort of reasonable protections already provided by Mountain View and San Jose.

By the council acting on this problem through a city ordinance, Palo Alto avoids the likelihood of a more restrictive and less balanced citizen initiative like in Mountain View which cannot not be modified except through a future vote of the electorate.

Renter Protection Goals

  • Support retention of a healthy, diverse community and local economy;
  • Moderate the rate of rent increases;
  • Provide protections from unjust evictions that are fair to both renters and landlords;
  • Continue topromote construction of new multi-unit rental developments.

Recommendations

  • An annual percentage cap on rent increases for multi-unit residences built before 1995, thereby continuing to encourage new housing construction.
  • Protections against tenant terminations without just cause while protecting the fair rights of property owners.
  • A city council ordinance rather than a voter initiative that will allow needed adjustments over time.

Here’s what you can do

  • Write to the Palo Alto City Council today at city.council@cityofpaloalto.org requesting they support the Colleagues Memo (agenda item 13).  Please write in your own words, and you may use the talking points above.
  • Come speak to the City Council tonight.  Arrive by 7:15pm.  Fill out a comment card requesting to speak to agenda item 13.  You will have two or maybe three minutes to speak.  It is best to prepare your remarks in advance, either word-for-word or in outline or note form.  You can make a short statement, simply to say something like, “I support the goals of recommendations of the colleagues memo.  Thank you.”

Jobs/housing: Tell Council your thoughts on office growth – September 5, 2017

On September 5, City Council will define its vision for future limits on the pace of growth for office and research and development (R&D) square footage in Palo Alto.

In this first step toward developing a permanent annual limit on office/R&D development, Council will direct staff regarding the following details of a possible ordinance:

  1. Boundaries of the areas that should be subject to an annual cap;
  2. The quantitative limit – should it be 50,000 sf or something different;
  3. Whether unused annual allocations should be “rolled over” to raise the cap in subsequent years;
  4. Whether current exemptions to the limit should be continued or modified; and
  5. How projects should be reviewed – competitive, first-come first-serve, or some other process.

Many Palo Altans see managing the pace of jobs growth as a vital piece of the puzzle to address our jobs/housing imbalance, while others worry that constraints on a strong office market will impair Palo Alto’s economic vitality.

Tell City Council where you stand on office growth limits. Speak up at City Council on September 5 at 6pm (City Hall) or send an email to the full Council at city.council@cityofpaloalto.org.